The thing about mobility is it’s gone before you know you lost it.

De-crep-i-tude (noun): the state of being old and no longer in good condition or good health

I was in the grocery store the other day and noticed a woman struggling to carry a gallon jug of milk. She was barely18 years old. A gallon of milk is just over eight pounds. It shouldn’t be a challenge for an 18 year old girl.

My 69 year old mother-in-law was in the gym today struggling to squat to a 16 inch box. The average toilet is between 14 and 16 inches tall. “Comfort height” toilets which are one to three inches taller than standard ones are becoming increasingly popular because many of us cannot lower ourselves to a depth of 16 inches.

Many of us struggle to climb a single flight of stairs, walk a single city block or carry a bag of groceries. We seem to have accepted this state of decrepitude as being normal. It isn’t just in seniors. This state of poor health stretches across all ages and socioeconomic groups. Our mobility, our ability to move with ease through our daily lives, is essential for our well-being.

The thing about mobility is it’s gone before you know you lost it.

It’s damn hard to get it back.

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